Creative Inspirations: Confessions Of A Type Nazi or How a Lifetime Obsession With Typography Took Me On A Journey I Could Never Have Imagined

Date: 
Tue, 01/22/2013 - 7:00pm - 9:00pm

Harry Marks

Arts Habitat will present Harry Marks, typographer, Emmy Award winning broadcast designer, and co-founder of the TED Conferences at Arts in Progress (AIP) on Tuesday, January 22, in a presentation entitled, "Creative Inspirations: Confessions of a Type Nazi or How a Lifetime Obsession with Typography Took Me on a Journey I Could Never Have Imagined."

AIP takes place the fourth Tuesday of each month from 7:00 to 9:00 p.m. This month AIP moves to a new venue, the Seaside Meeting Room at the Oldemeyer Center, 986 Hilby Avenue, Seaside. The event is open to the public, the admission fee is $5 and complimentary refreshments are served. The first and last half hours are devoted to socializing and community building; the program runs from 7:30 to 8:30 p.m.  

Harry Marks is considered by many to be the founding father of modern broadcast design. He began his career as a typographer and publications designer at Oxford University Press. At age twenty, he left his native soil of England and moved to San Francisco where he worked with the University of California Press. In the mid-1960s, he moved to Los Angeles to accept a job at ABC-TV, where his assignment was to improve the on-air graphic appearance of the network. He is also known for his work as an independent graphics consultant, including six years of on-air graphics for NBC-TV and branding for CBS and international TV networks. Harry is well known for his innovative use of emerging technologies.

He has earned nearly every award in broadcast design and promotion, including an Emmy and the first Lifetime Achievement Award from the Broadcast Design Association. 

In 1984, Harry had the notion of facilitating a gathering of people from the converging worlds of technology, entertainment, and design, so he partnered with Richard Saul Wurman and created the TED Conference. 

Now retired, Harry lives in Pebble Beach, where he spends his time on community projects and his own interests, including cooking, cameras, and computers.